Category Archives: feldenkrais podcast

Feldenkrais Classics: Try One For Free

Ryan Nagy, Feldenkrais Classics, Volume 2

 
Hi there, this is a free Feldenkrais session (often called a “lesson”) titled, “Rhythmic Tapping” from Volume Two of my “Feldenkrais Classics” series. By far, one of the best selling series on the work of Moshe Feldenkrais.

Enjoy!
 
 
Listen Online:


Or download to your computer and listen later:
Feldenkrais Classics: Rhythmic Tapping

More Free Feldenkrais Sessions

Scanning Yourself Deeply

Eliminate TMJ Now, Session #2: Shoulder, Neck and Jaw Connections:

Eliminate Back Pain While Sitting. Session #1: Turning Right and Left

Instant downloads of Feldenkrais mp3′s available on my store:

http://utahfeldenkrais.org/feldenkraismp3.html

Feldenkrais Podcasts: Ralph Hadden, Australia

Ralph Hadden, Feldenkrais Australia

This podcast was created earlier this year on a website called The Global Multiversity a website that I founded with Rob McNeilly from the The Milton H Erickson Institute of Tasmania

This particular podcast that I am re-broadcasting is Rob McNeilly interviewing Ralph Hadden, a Feldenkrais practitioner who works in and around Melbourne, Australia.

I think this one is fun because in addition to speaking about Ralph’s journey into the Feldenkrais work, it also has some wonderful bits and pieces of Feldenkrais history in Australia and elsewhere and also some stories about Frank Wildman, who introduced the trademarked version of Feldenkrais into Australia. And also you can hear a bit about Thomas Hanna and perhaps some other names that you might recognize.

It’s also fascinating because you get to hear Rob McNeilly, who is an Ericksonian hypnotist and former medical doctor, who spent some time with Milton Erickson really listening and wondering about what this set of processes – that some people call “The Feldenkrais Method – “IS” about and what it can do.

To me this is really a lovely interview, its about 38 minutes long. I hope you enjoy it:

Listen Online:

Or download to your computer and listen later:
Ralph Hadden Podcast



Feldenkrais Podcast with Edward Yu (The Art of Slowing Down)

I am republishing a couple of radio interviews with Edward Yu, the Feldenkrais Practitioner who wrote “The Art of Slowing Down, A Sense-ABLE Approach to running. For one interview by Lisa Garr of the Aware Show I could not obtain permission so I am only posting a 2-minute piece of the interview.

The second interview is from Robin Hood Radio a show from an NPR station in Sharon Connecticut. I am posting the entire interview with the permission of the interviewer Marshall Miles. If you want to subscribe to the Robin Hood Show you can do so through itunes: Robin Hood Radio on iTunes.

I hope you enjoy this! Both interviews are worth hearing:


Edward Yu Podcast (click!).


If you want to hear more from Edward, he has several presentations as well as an Awareness Through Movement lesson and a chapter from his book at the Feldenkrais Running Conference.

Mia Segal: Further Conversations


Mia Segal and Leora Gaster Podcast

This podcast was recorded on April 15th, 2010 in Austin, Texas. It was the third recorded conversation that I had with Mia and Leora. (The second has not been broadcast).

This last conversation almost didn’t happen. Both Mia and Leora felt we had covered a lot of ground during our previous conversations and weren’t quite sure what else needed to be said. But in the back of my mind I felt like something was still missing. So Leora graciously extended another invitation to talk before I left.

The conversation that you are about to hear is only about 20 minutes. But we cover a great deal of ground. Mia shares stories about Moshe, how fun he was and how full of laughter and jokes. We talk briefly about Moshe’s x-wife Yona Rubenstein. We also speak of Noah Eshkol who, according to Mia, was very close to Moshe in terms of personality. We end with a story of Moshe’s fears about the work getting diluted based on what was happening at Amherst after he left.

Mia Segal, Part 2: Further Conversations

Feldenkrais Trainings: How Many Graduates Start a Practice?

Have you ever wondered how many people graduate from Feldenkrais Trainings on a yearly basis? Curious how many of those people actually start practices?

Paul Rubin’s Answer

Last month on the FeldyForum, Feldenkrais Trainer Paul Rubin stated his belief that most people who graduate from a Feldenkrais professional training program end up using the work in some type of professional context such as a Feldenkrais practice, physical therapy practice, dance practice etc.

When someone on the forum asked him where he was getting his data from, Rubin made some vague reference to a straw poll that he had conducted. I am not surprised that a trainer would want to see himself, his trainings, and perhaps the profession at large, as able to successfully launch careers in the Feldenkrais Method. However, I was stunned that Paul would simply put forth his own assertions – with no supporting evidence or data – and expect people to believe what he was saying. Several people, myself included, said as much.

Rather than owning up to the fact that he had no reliable nor meaningful data, Paul began engaging in a whole series of ad hominem attacks, many of which were directed at me. Apparently, the fact that I challenged him to provide some evidence for assertions means that I am frustrated individual, who is preaching gloom and despair – blah blah blah.

I don’t remember exactly what Paul wrote and I have since canceled my membership to the FeldyForum and can’t go back to check. But suffice it to say, that in the absence of having any evidence or reasoned response, Paul Rubin saw fit to attack me personally. In fact, at one point, Rubin refused to even speak to me directly, writing, “someone said…” and wrote that I was “claiming to be an expert.” Point taken. If you disagree with Paul Rubin, you become a nameless, faceless “other.” And being unable to meaningfully criticize my views he attacked my credentials. I am truly sorry that he is in that space. Not only does it serve no purpose for anyone and degrade both him and the method, but it in no way supports his case.

The Research Answer

After a few days, Paul did manage to find a survey done by Rob Black (currently the FGNA President-Elect) in 1997. (PDF Download: Snapshot of Feldenkrais Practice. Rob’s survey was a valiant first attempt, and does provide some very interesting data about the state of the Feldenkrais Method 12 years ago. For example, it has data on practitioners reported income and satisfaction with their work.

However, like most convenience sample studies it has major limitations. For example, it’s not clear that Rob had access to contact information for those who were not in the guild database and may not have been practicing. We don’t know how many attempts were made to contact people, some regions of the country where not represented, and overall, there is no way of saying that the study is representative of the population of Feldenkrais practitioners 12 years ago, let alone today.

Again, it’s great that the attempt was made, and I am sure at some point that FGNA (The Feldenkrais Guild of North Americal) will follow-up up. However, one study does not constitute an answer to the question:

“How many people take Feldenkrais Trainings and actually start practices?”

Who else might have an answer to the question?

The IFF’s Answer

The IFF (International Feldenkrais Federation) has been doing a great deal of work in the area of developing competency profiles and attempting to improve the practice of practitioners. In a 2008 report, they stated:

It’s sobering but true. Only a fraction of Feldenkrais training program graduates are still
practicing members of their guild five years later.

(IFF Competency Profile, p4)

Note: The full IFF competency profile can be downloaded here: www.feldenkrais.com/download/profession/IFFCompetencyProfile.pdf

How they know that “only a fraction” are practicing members of their guild 5 years later, I do not know. Though I would hope that the report, compiled by representatives of Feldenkrais Guilds worldwide, has some factual basis for the assertion. I would certainly give it more credence than Paul Rubin’s dubious assertions.

Personal attacks on my character and intelligence notwithstanding, I cannot find any reliable or meaningful data on the efficacy of Feldenkrais trainings. If anyone can send me information, published or not, please do so, or leave a comment on this post.

Ryan’s Opinion

My personal opinion, (yes, that’s right my opinion) is that many people who take trainings have no intention of becoming practitioners, even if they state that as their goal. Currently, it’s difficult to find intensive experiences of the Feldenkrais Method without going to a training. Many people realize the value of the work and – I think – take trainings because they want a deeper experience of themselves and the method than they can get in a weekly class or weekend workshop. If that is true, it represents a huge opportunity, not just for Feldenkrais trainers, but for practitioners and assistant trainers.

Why?

I’d be willing to bet that those taking a feldenkrais training for largely personal reasons would be willing to spend money for less-expensive, but equally valuable intensive workshops. That is, they might be willing to attend a 1-week, 2-week, or even month-long workshop that would allow them to go deeply into the work without having to pay for the additional costs associated with the certification process (administration costs, staffing costs etc.) In addition to costing less, the workshop could be conducted by any practitioner willing to take the plunge and could serve as a valuable pathway for more people to learn about the work. It might also appeal to a much larger segment of the population.

And one last time – the question of how many people graduate from Feldenkrais trainings and then successfully create practices? I do not know.

And neither does Paul Rubin, nor anyone else in the Feldenkrais community.

Like it or not.

cheers – Ryan

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Ruthy Alon: Talking To The Bones

ruthy_alon_jumpI recently caught up with Ruthy Alon while she was in preparation for an upcoming 4-month international trip to teach Bones For Life and Feldenkrais. One of Moshe’s original “gang of 13″ students, Ruthy speaks not only about the development and origination of her own work – Bones For Life – but also her beginnings with Moshe Feldenkrais.

In this podcast, you can find out how Ruthy got the idea for Bones For Life, how she integrates Feldenkrais principles into her work, and how she originally “found” Moshe. Ruthy also shares a wonderful story about how she approached Moshe with the idea of teaching his work at an Israeli University. This was at at time before he had conducted a formal training or was even calling what he did “ATM” or “FI”….

Much more that I could say, but let’s have the conversation speak for itself:

Download

*When you click the link, the file should open automatically and play in another browser window. If not, you may need to download it to your computer. Also, if you use iTunes, you can go to the iTunes store and search for “Feldenkrais Podcasts” and each episode will download automatically.

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Move Into Life: Anat Baniel Speaks With Michael Merzenich

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In the interview below, Dr. Michael Merzenich speaks with Anat Baniel about her new book, Move into Life: The Nine Essentials for Lifelong Vitality Watching the clip, I am deeply impressed with Anat’s ability to speak about Feldenkrais principles in a manner that is clear and easy-to-understand. It is an important skill that more people might want to learn. I will let the interview speak for itself:

Steven Gilligan Podcast: Hypnosis, Milton and Moshe

Dr. Stephen Gilligan

Dr. Stephen Gilligan

In this 35-minute interview with Dr. Stephen Gilligan, we discuss a wide-variety of topics, including some of Steve’s early experiences with Milton Erickson, his development of Self-Relations Psychotherapy and the “third” generation of hypnosis, trance and change that he is developing now.

We also talk about some of the interrelations between between somatic practices such as Ericksonian Hypnosis, Feldenkrais-based methods and the martial arts and Steve shares some delightful stories about the meetings between Moshe Feldenkrais and Milton Erickson (Erickson and Feldenkrais) in 1976.

Steve conducts a yearly “Trance Camp” in Encinitas, California, which I have attended and thoroughly recommend. He also sells Hypnosis Training CD’s, DVD’s and books

Enjoy – Ryan Nagy

Stephen Gilligan Podcast (click to download)

If you know someone would would enjoy this, would you please use the link below to forward it or to post the interview to a social networking site? Even if only one new person finds this blog and podcast it is a big help.

Bonnie Humiston Podcast

Bonnie Humiston, Feldenkrais Trainer

Bonnie Humiston, Feldenkrais Trainer

Welcome to a 33-minute podcast with Feldenkrais Trainer Bonnie Humiston from Humiston Wellness.. Bonnie began her studies with Moshe Feldenkrais in 1971 and graduated from the first North American Feldenkrais training in 1977. She has been a two-time President of the Feldenkrais Guild of North America, charter member of the International Feldenkrais Federation Board of Directors, and primary editor of the Amherst Training materials.

This podcast contains a great deal on historical information regarding the Feldenkrais Method and the various “guiding” organizations that have developed around the work such as the country and region-specific Feldenkrais Guilds and the International Feldenkrais Federation.

Enjoy. Click the link to download: Bonnie Humiston Podcast

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